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Ion Beam Analysis

Facility Specialist:
Greg Haugstad
Description
Equipment
Accessories
Applications
Specifications
Sample Data
Operating Instructions



Description

Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) utilizes high-energy ion beams to probe elemental composition non-destructively as a function of depth to several microns with a typical depth resolution of 100-200 angstroms. It is a fast, nondestructive and standardless technique to quantify the absolute atomic ratios in compounds or mixtures, insensitive to their chemical environments. It can also determine the film thickness (or density) as well as the structural disorders in single crystalline targets. Energy distribution of backscattering ions quantifies the depth distribution for a given element. Distinctive characteristic X-rays emitted from the different target elements upon the beam bombardment ensure the accurate identification of similar mass elements. Gamma rays emitted from the beam-induced nuclear reactions provide an excellent sensitivity (~ppm) and/or depth resolution (~50 A) for certain light isotopes such as 1H, 15N, and 19F.

IBA is a broad term that involves several specific techniques, mainly:


Equipment

MAS 1700 pelletron tandem ion accelerator (5SDH) equipped with charge exchange RF plasma source by National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). Analytical endstation (RBS 400) and control software (HYPRA) by Charles Evans & Associates:
Graphic-interface computer control of data acquisition and ion beam characteristics:


Accessories


Applications

Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS):

Forward recoil spectrometry (FReS):

Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA):

Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis:

Ion channeling analysis


Specifications

Ion beam specifications:

Particle detector specifications:

Goniometer specifications:

Sample requirements:


Sample Data

IBA Data
The above compares data taken at random sample orientation (unchanneled) and under axial channeling conditions. The colored arrows denote the energies of backscattered He nuclei from different elements at two depth locations. A 3.5 MeV beam energy enables certain nuclear reactions, thereby increasing the sensitivity to N and C.


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Last update: October 2003
URL: http://www.charfac.umn.edu/InstDesc/IBAdesc.html